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The Shoe Does Not Drive Orthotic Success

by MASS4D® Prescription Orthotics August 03, 2016

The Shoe Does Not Drive Orthotic Success

Proper foot function affects the overall well-being of every individual, making it important to invest in shoes that are comfortable and provide adequate protection from the environment.

The consequences of poor fitting and inappropriate shoes include callouses and different types of toe deformities. Optimal footwear needs to prevent injury as well as provide comfort to the feet.

With an increase in people adopting active lifestyles, shoe companies are spending millions of dollars to produce the right kind of footwear for both, the athletic and non-athletic population.

Activewear with torsion control seems to be gaining popularity in the market, on account of its ability to limit impact forces and prevent hyperpronation.


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Designed using technologies to help facilitate better performance on the field, these shoes tend to be versatile in nature owing to their cushioned platforms, making them ideal for high-impact activities.

A number of studies in the past have proven that the effect of such kind of footwear on the musculoskeletal system remains minimal.

A study by Stacoff et al. conducted in 2001, clearly demonstrated how shoe sole modifications did not change tibiocalcaneal rototations substantially, hence challenging the notion that torsion control shoes can alter pronation.

Similarly, another study conducted by Butler et al concluded that no significant interaction was observed between torsion control shoes and peak eversion or eversion excursion in people with low arches.

The importance of an orthotic intervention can never be undermined to optimally correct foot posture and skeletal alignment.

MASS4D® recommends orthotic wearers use neutral shoes that do not offer pronation support or portion control to avoid an overcorrection of the problem.

Copyright 2016 MASS4D® All rights reserved.  


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References:

  1. Stacoff A, Reinschmidt C, Nigg BM, Van Den Bogert AJ, Lundberg A, Denoth J and Stüssi E (2001) Effects of shoe sole construction on skeletal motion during running. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise: February 2001, Vol. 33, No. 2
  2. Butler RJ, Hamill J, Davis I (2007) Effect of footwear on high and low arched runners' mechanics during a prolonged run. Gait & posture: July 2007, Vol. 26, No.2

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